Invest in Businesses Rather than Renting Stocks

Most business owners can feel the pulse of their business. If you own a coffee shop for instance, you can go to the location, see and interact with your employees, touch your inventory, and keep your customers happily caffeinated. You can smell the aroma of your business. You can feel it.

What if you had that same feeling as a shareholder of a public company? What if you thought like an owner? Consider one that sells coffee. Yesterday, you did not own any shares of this company, but today you are an owner – a shareholder.  The feeling of being an owner of that company is divorced from owning a percentage or shares in a public company. Some may think those shares represent a lotto ticket that goes up and down every business day on some stock exchange, based on public consensus or what some analyst says or does not say about that company’s future prospects. Some almost consider it like a casino.

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Steve Booren

Steve Booren

Steve started his investment career in 1978 with the NYSE investment firm EF Hutton, working in the environment of a large investment company. Desiring to provide clients with objective investment advice, he founded Prosperion Financial Advisors. Learn more about Steve here.

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Renegotiating with our Business Partner, Donald Trump

Imagine you have a business relationship with a partner. You work and run the business, and take home 65 percent of the profits for your efforts and your partner received 35%. Last December your partner recognized your hard work and rewarded you with an additional 14 percent of the business, reducing their take to 21 percent. Suddenly you are receiving a much larger portion of the profits.

At the same time your business partner has made an effort to reduce friction in the business and keep borrowing costs low. These are ideal conditions for your business to grow, and they are exactly what the U.S. Government has done.

In short, the tax cuts passed by Congress late last year are a big deal. Corporations are getting around 20 percent more tax relief and reflecting that relief in well-publicized bonuses to workers, increases in earnings, and growing dividend payments to the shareholders. All of that is not just good – but incredibly good for the American economy and citizens.

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Steve Booren

Steve Booren

Steve started his investment career in 1978 with the NYSE investment firm EF Hutton, working in the environment of a large investment company. Desiring to provide clients with objective investment advice, he founded Prosperion Financial Advisors. Learn more about Steve here.

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The Difference Between Financial and Investment Advice

There’s never been a better time to be an investor. Advances in technology have leveled the playing field in a truly unprecedented way. While these advances are great for you, they make offering value as financial advisors more difficult.

So as we continue to see improvements in technology I believe investment management will become more and more of a commodity. That means real financial advice will be a huge differentiator in the financial services industry. Anyone can create a portfolio, asset allocation or investment strategy. We are even told robots can do this with this concept called “Robo-Advisor”. What most people actually need is advice about how their investments fit into their overall financial plan, and more importantly their life. Believe me – robots cannot do this, nor do investment products do this. It takes an experienced, skilled, listening Advisor.

Both investment management and financial advice are necessary components for long-term success, but it’s important to understand the differences.

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Steve Booren

Steve Booren

Steve started his investment career in 1978 with the NYSE investment firm EF Hutton, working in the environment of a large investment company. Desiring to provide clients with objective investment advice, he founded Prosperion Financial Advisors. Learn more about Steve here.

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Meet Bob, The World’s Worst Market Timer

Did you invest some money on Jan. 26th? Do you ever feel “the curse” of investing at exactly the wrong point? Like your investing is too late, at the wrong time, or maybe that you’re just unlucky?

Well meet Bob – the World’s Worst Market Timer. Bob began his working career in 1970 at age 22 and was a diligent saver and planner.

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Steve Booren

Steve Booren

Steve started his investment career in 1978 with the NYSE investment firm EF Hutton, working in the environment of a large investment company. Desiring to provide clients with objective investment advice, he founded Prosperion Financial Advisors. Learn more about Steve here.

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The U.S. Economy & Markets

I am an optimist by nature. I feel this optimism is not pie-in-the-sky wishful thinking, but rather a view to the future that is based on a sound historical tract record and the economic progress we see across the globe. This optimism springs from characteristics that aren’t uniquely American, but we certainly are blessed by a population that exhibits many of these attributes:

  • Hard work
  • Ingenuity and creativity
  • Kean intellect
  • An entrepreneurial spirit
  • Productivity, efficiency, and a striving for improvement
  • Cutting edge mentality
  • Yet fun, fruitful, and an ever growing vision of what the future might hold

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Dave Anderson

Dave Anderson

As an advisor, Dave Anderson places a high priority on developing strong personal relationships with his clients. Frequent communication is important so that he works from an informed and timely view of his clients personal and life goals, financial objectives, priorities and risk tolerance. Learn more about Dave here.

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It’s Just the Road

In the last few days stocks have taken a beating.  Volatility has finally returned after a near two year hiatus.  Friday February 2nd saw the largest single one day drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average history.  The following Monday (Feb. 5th) saw some of the largest intraday swings in history, ranging from down over 500 points on the Dow to closing up over 500 points, with several corrections along the way.  Hopefully you were wearing your proverbial seat belt.

Many investors are calling this a “top”, the beginning of the next great recession, the last stop on the “Bull Market Express”, or even the end of the road. But here is the reality… it’s just the road. This is not the end of the road. This is not even a bump in the road. It’s just the road. History tells us that market’s do this. They move up, they move down. They trend sideways. They are at times, irrational.

So let’s put all of this recent activity in perspective.

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Brannon Brown

Brannon Brown

Brannon is a financial advisor with LPL Financial and also serves as the team’s wealth manager. He joined Prosperion Financial Advisors in 2004. In addition to being a Certified Financial Planner® (CFP) and an Accredited Portfolio Management Advisor®, Brannon has a Master’s degree in Leadership from Denver Seminary. He is passionate about helping clients make wise, informed, investment and financial planning decisions. He is married to the love of his life, Melanie, and is the proud father of his son, William. When not working with clients or spending time with family, Brannon enjoys being in the outdoors of the Colorado high country, skiing, fly fishing, and exploring wild country.

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What is “Normal”?

Over the last ten days the stock market has experienced higher levels of volatility than we’ve seen in some time. The result has been many headlines highlighting the downfall of a strong market. It’s left many people wondering if this is normal and healthy, or a sign of worse things to come.

But what is normal? In my experience, the only “Normal” setting I see is on the clothes dryer. Really normal is just a comparison of our experience today vs. our experience lately. Read more

Steve Booren

Steve Booren

Steve started his investment career in 1978 with the NYSE investment firm EF Hutton, working in the environment of a large investment company. Desiring to provide clients with objective investment advice, he founded Prosperion Financial Advisors. Learn more about Steve here.

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5 Tips to Help You Pursue Growth of Your Retirement Funds

How can you pursue growth of your retirement funds? We have five tips on how a dividend growth strategy that focuses on “blue chip” companies with a history of paying dividends may offer benefits when compared to a traditional investment portfolio.

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Steve Booren

Steve Booren

Steve started his investment career in 1978 with the NYSE investment firm EF Hutton, working in the environment of a large investment company. Desiring to provide clients with objective investment advice, he founded Prosperion Financial Advisors. Learn more about Steve here.

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2017 In Review

At the end of every year I enjoy taking a look back. As you probably know, I’m a big believer in perspective and investing for the long term. And though our ability to look forward in time is still a work in progress, our ability to look back and gain some perspective is always valuable. So as we wrap up 2017, I want to take a look back at some of the major events that defined the year.

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Steve Booren

Steve Booren

Steve started his investment career in 1978 with the NYSE investment firm EF Hutton, working in the environment of a large investment company. Desiring to provide clients with objective investment advice, he founded Prosperion Financial Advisors. Learn more about Steve here.

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How Dividend-Paying Stocks Are Like Tenants

Real estate investors ask, “How much income can this building produce?” In our opinion, stock market investors should too.

In real estate, people tend to invest for rental income today and the possibility for more an increased price tomorrow. But in the stock market, I’ve found that many investors focus on price and ignore the long-term potential of dividends. They’re taught to buy low and sell high—and they forget about the income opportunity between those two points. They may believe the price will go higher, or that maybe the company is on the cutting edge of some technology or breakthrough. So they wait, and hope to sell the stock for a profit later on. Some call this a “buy and hope” strategy.

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